Technology

Using the waste heat that is abundant at these heavy industry plants and feeding with steam, a thermochemical reaction can be driven to produce H2 and O2.
The electrical energy required can be also generated from waste heat through mature waste heat to power technologies.

How it Works

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Our solution is based on electrolysis, the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, and utilizes the thermochemical water splitting Copper Chlorine cycle, which is one of the green hydrogen pathways endorsed by the US DoE.

  • Based on the chemical reagent Copper 2 chloride (CuCl2) that is recycled in the reactions.

  • Consumes a fraction of electricity than a water electrolyzer as the majority of the energy driving the reactions is thermal energy.

  • Have greater tolerance to unfiltered water as the input is steam and water is not being directly split to H2 and O2.

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Meanwhile, Our solution can utilize waste heat as the energy source. H2 & O2 produced will be consumed on-site by the clients, eliminating transportation costs. Our system has a modular design, is highly digitalized, and incorporates IoT and machine learning that will further lower the maintenance cost and enable remote operation and maintenance.

Our Technology is

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Sustainable

Use waste heat to produce pure and clean H2 and O2 - with Zero greenhouse emission

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Modular

Easy-to-scale Hardware as a service (HaaS) model with IoT and Machine Learning capabilities

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Scientifically Proven

Developed by scientists and engineers from Ontario Tech University and other institutions

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Cost-Effective

Consume only 20-25% of Electricity vs Water Electrolyzers

No transportation need

Based on one of the Hydrogen production pathways endorsed by the Dept. Of Energy
And with help from
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